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Jewish Funerals

Although there are some stipulations that are set down by the Jewish faith, much of the funeral service is customized according to the family’s personal preferences and the customs of their community. For example, the funeral services may be held anywhere, including the synagogue or the funeral home. There is also no need to involve a member of the clergy, unless the family specifically desires to do so.

However, there are a few practices that are standard to Judaism:

  • Burial must occur as soon as possible (usually within 24 hours)
  • Caskets must be entirely biodegradable
  • Mourners do not greet others until after the burial of the deceased; they meet and wait together in a separate space before and after the service
  • Prior to the service, an officiant places a black ribbon on the outer garments of the attendees to symbolize a physical manifestation of grief

During the service, there are several standard components, such as the Hespeid (eulogy) and the El Malei Rachemim prayer, which serves as the sending off of the deceased to the “wings of God’s presence.”

After the service, the body is transported to the burial site and a short service is held at the cemetery.

The Jewish funeral is unique in that there is a specific process that happens following the burial. This includes the Nichum Avelin, or the comfort of the mourners, and Shiva, which is a week-long mourning period during which the family stays together to grieve.

We are well-versed in the processes of a Jewish funeral and would be honored to make all the necessary arrangements for you and your family.

Jewish cemetery: Star of David on the tombstone

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Jewish Funerals

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